Theses

Available theses

We have available theses on different topics within the scope of networking and ICT security. In particular our topics cover MAC protocols for WiFi, WiFi and short range radios in general, IoT, routing in wired and wireless networks, including wireless meshes and Community Networks, Vehicular networking with particular attention to road safety applications and cooperative/autonomous driving. MSc Theses are also available on the CSI-MURDER H2020 EU project.

Some “ready-to-start” theses are listed below, if you are interested, write a mail to either Gringoli or Lo Cigno to schedule an appointment. You can also propose us a topic to investigate, especially for BSc theses we are happy to assign general topics on Networking where the candidate has to write a short survey on the state of the art of the selected topic.

Reliable V2X communications via multiple communication channels.

   
Student  
Description Reliability is a fundamental requirement for vehicular communications dedicated to safety. Such a reliability cannot be achieved with any single technology. In the ANS lab, within the Veins simulation framework we are exploring the use of multiple technologies to achieve 6-nines reliability, i.e., well beyond what current 5G technology promise.
Thesis type B.Sc
A.Y. 2019-2020

LTE fuzzing - exploring vulnerabilities in mobile networks.

   
Student  
Description The security mechanisms deployed in mobile networks including LTE have been formally verified and no critical vulnerabilities have been found so far. Still it is not clear whether each specific implementation is bug-free or not: on the one side, people do not have access to core-network services and manufacturers sell eNodeB equipment only to major telco operators; on the other side, user-equipment run proprietary software on ad-hoc CPUs and flashing non-signed images seems to be not possible: this really limits the possibility to run active attacks and test the security of the core-network. This last issue can be overcome by adopting Software Defined Radio devices at the user side: by using open source implementations like srsUE, hackers can customise the protocol stack and run attacks based on protocol fuzzing. In this thesis students will first assemble and deploy the SDR based user-equipment demonstrating that it can be connected to a real telco network. Later they will modify the SDR software for running novel fuzzing attacks that they should design after having carefully studied the 3GPP standard documentation.
Thesis type M.Sc.
A.Y. 2019-2020

CSI-cracker - preserving the privacy of the users by cracking fake CSI data.

   
Student  
Description Channel State Information collected by Wi-Fi sniffers can be used for monitoring physical environments, including people movements and gestures. While several papers investigated the performance achievable in terms of accuracy by such monitoring approaches, nobody has still analyzed how to make them uneffective and restore the privacy of the users. In this work, students will first deploy a CSI based monitoring tool and measure its accuracy; later they will explore novel techniques that can be used for decreasing the measured accuracy, exploiting in particular methods based on the random modification of the physical preamble of the transmitted frames.
Thesis type M.Sc.
A.Y. 2019-2020

Active theses

Opensource tools for experimenting with 5-th generation mobile systems architecture.

   
Student Uldanay Moldagaliyeva
Description Practical experimentation with cellular networks has been historically reserved exclusively to operators, primarily due to equipment costs and licensing constraints. The state of play is changing with the advent of open-source cellular stacks based on increasingly more affordable software defined radio (SDR) systems. Comprehensive understanding of the performance, limitations, and interoperability of these tools however lacks especially when considering upcoming specifications of the 5-th generation mobile systems architecture. In this thesis students will first assemble and deploy a SDR based point-to-point 5G channel building on the OpenAirInterface software framework. They will then use the deployed network for understanding the maximum performance achievable with software-only approach in terms of throughput and latency under different conditions of noise and fading.
Thesis type M.Sc.
A.Y. 2019-2020

Completed theses

Performance analysis of an open source Bluetooth sniffer

   
Student Pietro Bonardi
Description In the ANS lab we are developing a framework for sniffing Bluetooth Low Energy 5 sessions using cheap USB dongles manufactured by Nordic. To this end we are replacing the proprietary softdevice kernel with a low level code that we developed from scratch for sniffing connection requests on advertisement channels and start hopping as soon as a connection indication frame is received.
Thesis type B.Sc
A.Y. 2019-2020